Truro Daily News: 2/2/12 – Dog survives terrifying ordeal on Halifax bridge

Dog survives terrifying ordeal on Halifax bridge

Sasha, a mixed breed terrier, is alive today thanks to the efforts of Angela Smith, formerly of Valley, who now lives in Halifax. The dog, which had run away from its owner, was repeatedly run over by motorists on a Halifax bridge on Monday morning. SUBMITTED PHOTO
Sasha, a mixed breed terrier, is alive today thanks to the efforts of Angela Smith, formerly of Valley, who now lives in Halifax. The dog, which had run away from its owner, was repeatedly run over by motorists on a Halifax bridge on Monday morning….
Published on February 2, 2012

Former Valley resident the ‘lucky animal lover who was there at the right time and place’

Topics : 
Leah BanksHalifax ,Dartmouth , Colchester County

TRURO – Angela Smith was heading across the bridge into Dartmouth Monday morning when she noticed a sudden disruption in the traffic flow.

“I assumed people were slowing down because of the heavy traffic and there was a couple of transport trucks going uphill,” the former Valley resident said.

She then noticed that several vehicles appeared to be driving over something and, to her horror, realized it was a dog.

“When I stopped, I was stopping to move a dead dog off to the side, so I thought,” Smith said. “I could clearly see from my car she was still breathing. I jumped out of my car, looked around and hoped people wouldn’t start honking at me because I was stopping rush hour traffic.”

Other drivers didn’t honk but neither did they offer assistance.

“No one really helped. I went to her and she didn’t move. I grabbed a blanket out of my trunk, got her on it and into the back seat of my car.  The race was on …”

Smith eventually got the injured dog transported to the Dartmouth Vet Clinic where it was treated for a badly fractured jaw, head trauma, an injured paw and tail and various scrapes.

Despite not knowing who the dog belonged to and even after being told that vet bills could reach as high as $2,500, Smith remained committed to dealing with the situation, all the while worrying about its fate.

“My day was filled with the ‘what ifs?'” she said. “What if I was five minutes earlier or five minutes later? I haunted myself with thoughts of seeing worse happen to her … that the cars that were driving over her continued to damage her more, or worse, finish the job. I was driving myself nuts with these silly thoughts.”

Needing something positive to focus on, Smith turned to the social networking power of Facebook and decided to start a fundraiser for the injured dog.

It was also through Facebook that she discovered it was a Jack Russell/Australian cattle dog mix named Sasha, that had been missing for several days.

Last November, Sasha was placed with Leah Banks of Cole Harbour as a foster dog through the volunteer agency Animal Rescue Coalition (ARC) of Halifax, after being picked up as a runaway stray in Colchester County.

“Within a day, she was attached to me and my younger dog Ash,” Banks said. “What a little Miss Busy Bee … she loved doing circles in our living room or playing tug-of-war and stealing Ash’s toys and playing with my cat Dewey.”

Sasha also enjoyed many outings with Leah and her family but as much as the dog had taken to her foster home, it was intended as just that.

Last week, Sasha was adopted by a person in Halifax. But it soon became apparent that was not where she wanted to be, and within 24 hours of seeing her off, Banks received a dreaded call that her little friend had run away from her new home.

That prompted a frantic search over the next several days by Banks and her family, who suspected Sasha was attempting to make her way to Leah’s father’s house in Dartmouth, from where she had been walked in previous months. Despite numerous sightings, however, Sasha remained on the loose until Monday morning when she got caught up in rush-hour traffic on the Murray MacKay Bridge.

Sasha has now been reunited with Banks and has a permanent place in her home.

And between Smith’s fundraising efforts and contributions from Banks, Sasha’s vet’s bills of about $1,600 are being taken care of.

But Smith is encouraging anyone who may be affected by the story to donate to ARC to assist with the needs of other animals that require care.

Looking back on things, she has mixed feelings about the situation.

“It’s hard to be angry when you don’t have a specific person to be angry towards,” she said of the motorists who repeatedly ran over the little dog.

“I’m angry inside, but really, it’s more nauseating then anything … It’s why I think this story is so important – people just shouldn’t assume an animal is dead. She clearly wasn’t and is clearly alive to this day. I hate thinking about this part of it all the most because it takes me back to the what ifs?

“Maybe I was meant to be there – maybe someone up above said: ‘OK Sasha – time to stop running. It’ll hurt but I’ll help you find your way home.’ And then I was just a part of that plan. I’m not the angel, I’m just the lucky animal lover who was there at the right time and place.”

HAPPY ENDING "Thank You" from Dena's Family

This was published in a kijiji (online classifieds) ad on Saturday January 14, 2012:

3 year old female white german shepard DENA was missing from Cedar Lake/Beaver River Road area. Was FOUND in Long Tusket Lake area. MANY MANY THANKS TO ALL THOSE WHO WERE LOOKING OUT FOR HER. OUR COLLECTIVE PRAYERS WERE ANSWERED. Denise, Rod, Mike from New Tusket/Weymouth area … you are special people and went above and beyond to get our dog home. For the Lost Dog Network of Nova Scotia…this would never have happened without your interventions. We are a happy family once again!

PRESS RELEASE: First Anniversary 1/11/12

Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 11, 2012 –  “More than a dog a day!” The Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network is celebrating its FIRST anniversary.  The Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network, which uses social media (Facebook, Twitter and it’s website ns.lostdognetwork.com) to help bring missing dogs home has resolved 470 cases to date. That is well over a dog a day!   Nothing the three founders, Ann and Heather Morrison and Janet Chernin ever anticipated last January when they started the network after the successful search for a Bernese Mountain Dog called Annie using Facebook.

Website redesign was necessary for the Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network due to its’ huge success and rapid growth in it’s first year. Implementing new ways to report lost or found dog information more efficiently. This allows for an almost self-service approach. The new Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network website will include a blog discussing important issues surrounding lost dogs such as prevention, animal behaviour, and community issues. The site will continue to provide a comprehensive list of resources for people to use in helping “bringing missing dogs home”.

With the  Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network now reaching more than 4000 members the plight of lost dogs is changing in this province. Dogs once considered “strays” are now being considered a “lost dog needing help”. This change makes reuniting dogs with their owners much more likely. Keeping dogs out of shelters and rescues frees up space and resources for the dogs who truly need it. Co-operation from and with animal services, shelters and rescues has been a win-win situation for everyone – especially the dogs. Its’ easy for these services to match up dogs in their system with dogs on our site, making for possible faster reunions with happy owners.

High profile cases and extraordinary success stories have helped heighten the exposure of the Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network which relies on its over 4000 members to share the information they receive to bring missing dogs home. Cases such as that of Luna, the visiting dog from Austria who bolted at fireworks, and was flown home a week later, Buster, gone 9 months and returned home, safe and sound, and Bandit, despite several sightings is still missing. His owner and the network have never given up hope and the search continues.

With the new website, Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network begins a new era in helping lost dogs in Nova Scotia.  Our hopes for the future are to expand LostDogNetwork.com to include other communities in Canada and the US.

The Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network owes it’s success to, and would like to thank, all its volunteer members and all those who take the time to read and/or share a post of a lost or found dog – Helping “bringing missing dogs home”.

Reigning Cats and Dogs – Community Herald Review

musings of a middle aged granny

Monday, April 11, 2011

Nova Scotia’s Lost Dog Network makes the Paper!

from today’s Herald
Missing dogs focus of online search network

Sisters who operate website share passion for animals
By GEOFF BIRD
Mon, Apr 11 – 4:54 AM
(PETER PARSONS / Staff)
When Duke went missing last week, a team of investigators quickly mobilized to find the 40-kilogram boxer.
Shortly after he posted his dog’s information on Kijiji, Duke’s owner Tyler Naugler of Spryfield got a call from Anne Morrison of the Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network saying she was on the case.
“She was absolutely unbelievable,” Naugler said.
The network, launched with a website in January, has quickly grown into a popular resource for dog owners whose pets go missing, with around five new posts every day.
Morrison gave Naugler a template for a lost dog poster and told him what steps to take to find his missing dog.
He made calls to a local shelter and filled out posters with Duke’s photo. The following morning, Halifax Regional Municipality’s animal services brought Duke home. The happy ending is one of many the lost dog network has had role in.
Morrison and her sister, Heather, see their website as a way to get the word out about missing dogs and provide a resource to those who are under emotional stress while their dogs are missing.
“We’ve all lost a dog, whether it was for five minutes or five days, and it is just heart-wrenching,” said Morrison.
The sisters are volunteers with the Alliance for Responsible Pet Ownership and are passionate about animals.
They created the website after locating a missing Burmese mountain dog over Christmas using Facebook and posters. The network of people they created through Facebook
“We thought, ‘Wow, we could do this for a lot of dogs,’ ” said Heather Morrison. They created the lost dog network website, found at bit.ly/eCGsAQ, soon after.
The sisters trawl Craigslist and Kijiji every day looking for new posts and people they can help. But people are now coming to them when their dogs go missing.
The majority expect the worst, thinking their pet is either stolen or lunch meat for a hungry coyote, the Morrisons said. They give encouragement to them, reminding them that 80 per cent of the time dogs are just lost.
The sisters post the information they receive from owners on their website and send it out via linked Twitter and Facebook accounts.
The site has photos of lost dogs as well as posts for dogs that people catch roaming in their yards and neighbourhoods.
And there’s a list of happy endings, dogs reunited with their owners, each filed with the same update: “Home safe ’n’ sound.”
( gbird@herald.ca)
To visit The NS Lost Dog Network Facebook Page, click here
To visit their lovely website, click here
to find out more about ARPO, click here
What time is it?   It is always time to applaud the volunteer love that powers initiatives like this!    Way to go, Ann, Heather, Janet C and every kind heart who takes the time to share and use social networking to get these dogs back home to the families that love them!
Posted by Old Maid at 2:52 PM

Me and My Dogs in Halifax, Nova Scotia – Blog about Bella the Lost Greyhound

Me and My Dogs in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Lost Greyhound in North End Halifax – Bella/Passport

There is a very large search going on tonight for a greyhound in the Hydrostone area of Halifax – her name is Bella – but she might answer to the name of Passport – she has been missing since Monday – and was last seen Devonshire at around 2pm.

She still has her collar and lead on her. Please call her owner at 292-3314 or her cell phone at her cell is 483-2975 if you find her or even see her.

The urgent thing is that this rescue Greyhound came in on this past Saturday so she’s absolutely NEW to the area – she is probably completely afraid and shell-shocked.

She is listed on the Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network – and also has an ad on Kijiji if you need more information – here’s hoping that she gets home safely – quickly.

Posted by Joan Sinden at Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Read this blog here

COMMUNITY HERALD ARTICLE

Missing dogs focus of online search network
Sisters who operate website share passion for animals
By GEOFF BIRD
Mon, Apr 11 – 4:54 AM

*
Tyler Naugler and his dogs Daisy, left, and Duke look over a laptop at their home in Spryfield on Wednesday. Naugler was able to find Duke, who was lost recently, with the help of a dog finding service on Kijiji. (PETER PARSONS / Staff)

When Duke went missing last week, a team of investigators quickly mobilized to find the 40-kilogram boxer.
Shortly after he posted his dog’s information on Kijiji, Duke’s owner Tyler Naugler of Spryfield got a call from Anne Morrison of the Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network saying she was on the case.
“She was absolutely unbelievable,” Naugler said.
The network, launched with a website in January, has quickly grown into a popular resource for dog owners whose pets go missing, with around five new posts every day.
Morrison gave Naugler a template for a lost dog poster and told him what steps to take to find his missing dog.
He made calls to a local shelter and filled out posters with Duke’s photo. The following morning, Halifax Regional Municipality’s animal services brought Duke home. The happy ending is one of many the lost dog network has had role in.
Morrison and her sister, Heather, see their website as a way to get the word out about missing dogs and provide a resource to those who are under emotional stress while their dogs are missing.
“We’ve all lost a dog, whether it was for five minutes or five days, and it is just heart-wrenching,” said Morrison.
The sisters are volunteers with the Alliance for Responsible Pet Ownership and are passionate about animals.
They created the website after locating a missing Burmese mountain dog over Christmas using Facebook and posters. The network of people they created through Facebook was determined to find the dog, which turned up after 11 cold days wandering in the woods.
“We thought, ‘Wow, we could do this for a lot of dogs,’ ” said Heather Morrison. They created the lost dog network website, found at bit.ly/eCGsAQ, soon after.
The sisters trawl Craigslist and Kijiji every day looking for new posts and people they can help. But people are now coming to them when their dogs go missing.
The majority expect the worst, thinking their pet is either stolen or lunch meat for a hungry coyote, the Morrisons said. They give encouragement to them, reminding them that 80 per cent of the time dogs are just lost.
The sisters post the information they receive from owners on their website and send it out via linked Twitter and Facebook accounts.
The site has photos of lost dogs as well as posts for dogs that people catch roaming in their yards and neighbourhoods.
And there’s a list of happy endings, dogs reunited with their owners, each filed with the same update: “Home safe ’n’ sound.”
( gbird@herald.ca)